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Offer of the Month
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Pay less, get more: 4 reports for the price of 1 during March 2019

 
Take advantage of our great offer and receive 4 reports on the hottest topics in industry right now: environmental sustainability and social responsibility.
 

Our exclusive offer includes:

  • "Environmental sustainability in textiles and apparel—ten years on"
  • "Time to reassess the environmental sustainability of natural fibres versus man-made fibres?"
  • "Talking strategy: how ethical is your brand"
  • "Five years on from the collapse of Rana Plaza: how reliable and competitive is Bangladesh as a sourcing location?"


It is just ten years since Textiles Intelligence first published the word "sustainability". Recycling, now commonplace, was relatively new in 2009 and so too was the concept of fibres made from unusual, naturally occurring renewable resources. In fact, the concept of environmental sustainability was a novelty often used as a mere marketing tool.
 
However, since then, consumers have grown increasingly concerned with the story behind the products they buy—especially clothing. As such, avoiding environmental issues has wreaked havoc on the reputations of some popular brands and manufacturers. Among the biggest issues are the amounts of water and land required for the cultivation of natural fibres, including cotton, and the potentially harmful chemicals associated with the production of man-made fibres.
 
Corporate social irresponsibility (CSR) has also plagued some companies in recent years, particularly in the wake of the disastrous collapse of Rana Plaza—an eight-storey commercial building in Bangladesh which housed a shopping mall and five garment factories. The collapse resulted in the deaths of more than 1,100 people, most of them apparel workers, and caused injuries to several hundred others.
 
The four reports in our exclusive offer cover topics related to environmental sustainability in the supply chain and CSR, including:

  • sustainability in innovations
  • sustainability as an essential component of corporate culture
  • the sustainability of natural fibres, including cotton
  • man-made cellulosic fibres as a sustainable alternative to natural fibres
  • the principle of "reduce, reuse, recycle"
  • ethical standards organisations which facilitate, support or monitor sustainable practices and standards
  • ethical standards certification
  • online platforms which help consumers to find ethical brands
  • initiatives aimed at improving factory and building safety
  • measures aimed at addressing wage levels and poor treatment of workers


During March 2019, buy 4 reports for the price of 1 and pay only:

  • US$475 (if you are in the Americas or Asia Pacific); or
  • Euro350 (if you are in Europe, the Middle East or Africa); or
  • £200 + VAT if you are in the UK.

 
Please contact subscriptions@textilesintelligence.com to request an order form. But remember this offer is only valid until March 31, 2019.
 
NB: Please note that this offer may not be used in conjunction with any other offers.


"Environmental sustainability in textiles and apparel—ten years on"
 
List of contents

 
"SUSTAINABILITY" TEN YEARS ON
 
"PUSH" AND "PULL" EFFECTS ALONG THE SUPPLY CHAIN
 
SUSTAINABILITY IN INNOVATIONS
 
TEN YEARS ON: SUSTAINABILITY AS AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF CORPORATE CULTURE


"Time to reassess the environmental sustainability of natural fibres versus man-made fibres?"
 
List of contents

 
NATURAL FIBRES VERSUS MAN-MADE FIBRES
 
MAN-MADE SYNTHETIC FIBRES VERSUS MAN-MADE CELLULOSIC FIBRES
 
COTTON FIGHTS BACK
 
DO MAN-MADE CELLULOSIC FIBRES PROVIDE THE ANSWER?


"Talking strategy: how ethical is your brand"
 
List of contents

 
SETTING THE SCENE
 
INTRODUCTION
 
CREATING AN ETHICAL PRODUCT
 
ETHICAL STANDARDS ORGANISATIONS WHICH FACILITATE, SUPPORT OR MONITOR SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES AND STANDARDS
 
CERTIFICATION
bluesign
World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) Fair Trade Standard
Fair Wear Foundation (FWF)
Flocert
Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)
ISO 9001: 2015
Standard 100 by Oeko-Tex
SA8000 Standard
Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production (WRAP)
 
LABELS
Fair trade
Organic standards
Environmental standards
 
REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE
 
SOME EXAMPLES OF ETHICAL BRANDS
Fair trade
Organic standards
Environmental standards
 
REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE
 
SOME EXAMPLES OF ETHICAL BRANDS
H&M
Know The Origin
Páramo Unifi
 
OTHER ORGANISATIONS INVOLVED IN THE ETHICAL PRODUCTION OF APPAREL
 
ONLINE PLATFORMS WHICH HELP CONSUMERS TO FIND ETHICAL BRANDS
 
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Circular economy


"Five years on from the collapse of Rana Plaza: how reliable and competitive is Bangladesh as a sourcing location?"
 
List of contents
 
INTRODUCTION
 
INITIATIVES AIMED AT IMPROVING FACTORY AND BUILDING SAFETY IN BANGLADESH
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety
Bangladesh Sustainability Compact
   European Commission report: progress made and steps which still need to be taken
   Compliance with obligations under the Bangladesh Sustainability Compact
 
MEASURES AIMED AT ADDRESSING WAGE LEVELS, POOR TREATMENT OF WORKERS AND SECURITY FEARS
Strikes relating to low wages and a new minimum wage
Poor treatment of workers
Security fears and measures aimed at addressing them
 
EFFECTS ON BANGLADESH'S EXPORTS
EU clothing imports from Bangladesh
US imports from Bangladesh
 
CONCLUSION

To take advantage of this special offer contact us by email.

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+44 (0)1625 536136

Please quote offer code MSO1903 when contacting us.

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